1. Women prefer to date taller men; tall men attract more desirable partners.

On average, women have a strong preference for tall men. In fact, women care more about dating taller men than men care about dating shorter women.

A study on women and men’s height preferences found that women are most satisfied when their partner was 8 inches (21cm) taller

Relatedly, a study about height and human mate choice found that, on average, just 4% of women would accept a relationship where they were taller than their male partner.

2. People view short men as less attractive and less successful. 

In a paper titled, Height Stereotypes of Women and Men: The Liabilities of Shortness for Both Sexes, researchers investigated stereotypes about height. Researchers asked a group of women to imagine a man who was either “short”, “average” or “tall”.

Participants viewed short men as less socially attractive, less successful, less physically attractive, less well-adjusted, and less masculine than both average and tall men. Average and tall men did not differ on those characteristics. But participants viewed tall men as more athletic than average (and short) men. The researchers state that “shortness is more of a liability than tallness is an asset.”

3. Tall people make more money. Economists call this the “height premium.” 

More height is associated with higher earnings. One study found that for both men and women, a 1-inch increase in height is associated with a 1.4–2.9 percent increase in weekly earnings.

Another study found that each inch of height is associated with earning nearly $800 more per year. This suggests that men who are 6 feet tall earn, on average, about $160,000 more over a 30-year career compared with men who are 5 feet 5 inches tall.

4. Tall people get better paid jobs. 

This is likely one reason why taller people, on average, earn more. In fact, some researchers attribute the height premium to taller people obtaining more education. As a result, they enter higher-paying positions.

In the U.S., men in white-collar jobs are about one inch taller than men in blue-collar jobs. In the UK, the situation is similar: men in white-collar jobs are 0.6 inches taller, on average, than men in blue-collar jobs.

A study of 950,000 Swedish men found that among pairs of brothers, the taller brother was more likely to obtain a better job. Men taller than 6 feet 3 inches (194 cm) were 2 to 3 times more likely to obtain a higher paid job compared to men shorter than 5 feet 4 inches (165 cm). The same study also controlled for year of birth, socioeconomic status, shared family factors, and cognitive ability. They still found a significant positive correlation between height and job success.